Sunday Service Times with Holy Eucharist.

The Holy Eucharist Rite I 7:30 a.m. (without music)

The Holy Eucharist Rite II 10:00 a.m. (with music)

Ash Wednesday Services, Feb. 14, 2018, 12:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.

 

Prayer

The Christian life is, at its heart, a life of prayer. When we gather each Sunday, we join the entire Church in all ages in the great prayer of the church, the Eucharist. Our communal prayer is enriched by individual prayer and devotion, as we lay our own experiences at the altar of God.

As we return to the world, our prayer continues throughout the week: events in the news prompt our concern, we share companionship with others as our life journeys come together, and we seek to serve Christ in all those we meet. The life of the parish continues in prayer as well: in reading and study of the Scriptures, in gathering to make music, and in meeting to share the walk of faith, we learn to hear God’s voice, returning again and again to break bread around the family table where we meet as a parish family, the Body of Christ.

We have many particular ways to support our common life in prayer. Our intercessory prayer ministry prays for those who ask for ongoing prayer in their lives; the Prayers of the People are part of the Sunday liturgy where parishioners serve as intercessors to lead us in prayer for the wider church and the world; and members gather throughout the week for centering prayer.

Centering Prayer

Centering Prayer is a modern prayer practice (similar to meditation) that renews the Christian contemplative tradition and calms the noise of our hearts, minds, and lives.  Simply pausing to enter a place of stillness gradually transforms and heals our relationship with God, ourselves and others. Centering Prayer is held in the Guild Hall each Tuesdays and Thursday  from 5:15 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.andSundays at 7:00 p.m..  Newcomers and beginners are welcome.

Praying the Daily Office

The Daily Office is the part of our Anglican heritage that most deeply resembles the prayer life of those who live in monastic communities.  The Book of Common Prayer (1979) offers liturgies for ordinary people to set their daily clocks to a rhythm of prayer.  The Offices are Morning Prayer, Noonday Prayer, Evening Prayer and Compline or (Nighttime Prayer).  The Book of Common Prayer also offers an abbreviated form of Daily Devotions for use with Individuals and/or Families.

The Lessons for each day are divided into a 2 year cycle and if completed, allows one to read through the Old Testament once, the New Testament twice, and the Psalms every seven weeks.  The Daily Office “lectionary” (or schedule of lessons) is found in the back of the Book of Common Prayer.

Many choose to follow the Daily Office using an online resource.  One such website is Mission St. Clare (www.missionstclare.com)  This site also has downloadable apps for Androids, iPhones, iPads and Kindles.